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The Art of Breeding, Conditioning & Racing Pigeons at The Extreme Distance - Part 8

 

THE ART OF BREEDING, CONDITIONING & RACING PIGEONS AT THE EXTREME DISTANCE - Part 8

by Gareth Watkins

In this the eighth part of the long distance series I intend to highlight the methods birds and performances of Tony Leggatt of Havant in Hampshire and John and Spencer Nicholson of Rochester in Kent. These are three more top class fanciers who have set their stalls out with the intention of competing at the extreme distance with their own distinct families of long distance racers, which they have developed as a result of more than 30 years of trial and error at the extreme distance. However, I should also make clear that Tony Leggatt has developed his family of pigeons which are more than capable of winning from 100 miles to 650 miles, as the results that are appended at the end of this section clearly demonstrate.

TONY LEGGATT

Tony is now in his early 60s and not far off retirement, having wound down to working part time in recent years. He started in the sport as a 12 year old, keeping a few strays in an old chicken shed. However, Tony soon gravitated to the racing side of the sport and obtained some top class pigeons from the late Ned Hammond of Emsworth. These were a combination of pigeons from two of the most successful fanciers ever to compete into Southern England, none other than the late Norman Southwell and Vic Robinson. Various introductions have been made over the intervening years but the base of the present day family still remains the Ned Hammond Southwell x Robinson pigeons. These are medium sized silky feathered athletes of various colours including dark chequers, smokey blues and the occasional red. They have strong rich eyes and have been developed by constantly testing each generation and only breeding from the consistent multiple prize winners in cross channel races.

Tony Leggatt

Tony and his lovely wife Sue have been at their present address since 1992 and in that time Tony has built an impressive loft to house his equally impressive family of long distance racers. This measures 28ft x 8ft and faces south, thus ensuring that there is plenty of sunlight in the loft for the greater part of daylight hours. The loft has six sections – two 4ft x 5ft sections at either end separated by four 5ft x 5ft sections. These four sections are each fitted with eight nest boxes. A three-feet wide corridor runs the length of the loft and allows access to each section. The birds enter the loft via traps set high in the loft front. They then drop down into the corridor and can be ushered into their appropriate section. Air enters the loft via the traps and also through vents set at floor level. The loft floor is constructed at two different levels – the rear three feet being some three inches lower than the front section. This three inch gap is covered with fine mesh which allows air to enter at floor level in front of the nest boxes no matter which way the wind is blowing. The gap also allows dust to be evaccuated whenever a bird flies up or down to the floor. The internal air flow within the loft is augmented by the use of mesh covered panels set into the ceilings of each section. Stale air is drawn out of the loft through these apertures to escape via ventilation tiles set in the ridge of the tiled roof. A second loft has now been built to house the retired racers and some young birds and this has an aviary attached.

Anniversary Waltz

The Leggatt team usually amounts to just 20 pairs of old birds and from these a modest team of 30 or so youngsters are reared each year. Tony does not keep stock birds but does retire a few old favourites once their racing careers are over. The birds are usually mated in the first week of March and are allowed to sit and rear before some of the team are separated and raced on roundabout, with the remainder raced on the natural system. The lofts are cleaned 365 days of the year, and during the summer months Tony is at the loft before 6 am each day. The roundabout hens are let out for their early morning fly at 6 am  during which time the lofts are scraped clean. The roundabout cocks are then allowed their liberty between 7 am and 8 am, when they are fed in and the loft opened for the natural team to enjoy an open loft for the rest of the day. Tony’s wife Sue traps the naturals when she gets home from work at 4 pm so that the roundabouts are ready for Tony to let out for their second exercise period when Tony arrives home at 5 pm. The young bird team are allowed their liberty once the roundabouts have done their stint and very often, in the build up to the longer races, the natural cocks are allowed out once more for some late evening exercise. Obviously, now that Tony is semi-retired the regime is not so hectic but the same principles remain in place.

Main loft right and young bird loft with aviary on the left

All birds are treated for cocci, canker and worms before mating and are also given their annual jab for Paramyxo. No other treatments are given and anything that goes wrong subsequently is summarily disposed of. Once the moult is completed the birds are fed a mixture of farm beans, wheat and barley that Tony makes up to his own specifications. When rearing they are fed a mixture of farm beans and peas to which Tony adds a good breeding mixture marketed by Brian Wall’s Gem Products. During racing the racers are fed yet another home made mixture consisting of various types of peas, wheat, Gem 4 Seasons mix plus groats, and various seeds. This is fed in the individual boxes so that Tony can more easily monitor each bird’s dietary intake.

When racing, the birds are only lightly trained as Tony likes to get his birds fit with the regular twice daily home exercise regime outlined earlier. The Palamos pigeons have two short channel races plus a few 40 mile trainers and then three weeks complete rest, apart from home exercise, prior to basketting for the big one at 650 miles. On the other hand Pau / Tarbes pigeons get four preparatory races including hopefully an 8 hour fly in the final preparation before basketting. Tony has never enjoyed any success when sending birds to the longer races feeding small squabs and as a result prefers his candidates to be sent sitting 10 – 14 day eggs.

Blue pied cock - 6th section 20th open BBC Barcelona in 2009

Cheq pied hen - 9th section 20th open CSCFC Tarbes in 2010

Calum's Eye - 8th section 48th open NFC Tarbes 2005, 5th section 10th open BBC Bordeaux 2005, 11th section 30th open BBC Bordeaux 2006, 35th section 126th open BBC Poitiers 2007, 32nd section 55th open CSCFC Pau 2007, 9th section 48th open BICC Pau 2009, 22nd open BICC/Paul O'Leary Narbonne, 4th section (first hen in central section) 22nd open BICC Pau 2010.

Cheq pied cock - 10th section 25th open CSCFC Tarbes 2010

Dark Cock - 1st Solent Fed Guernsey as a YB in 2010

The young bird team is usually raced through to 140 miles when Tony might select a few for the future whilst racing the rest of the team out to the bitter end. The youngsters are trained as often as possible from all points of the compass before the first race with the occasional training toss thereafter as and when Tony thinks they need it. Yearlings have selected races out to around 400 miles and are then ready for 500 – 650 mile racing as two year olds.

The following results prove the efficiency of the Leggatt system and I’m sure the reader will notice that Tony does not get just one pigeon in the result but usually clocks a team of pigeons from what is usually a relatively small entry. An example of this is a recent Palamos race at 650 miles when, from a six bird entry, Tony clocked FIVE for 15th, 18th, 22nd, 42nd & 43rd Open!!! In another race from Bordeaux Tony clocked six birds to win 15th, 23rd, 38th, 63rd, 86th & 118th Open. Obviously the highlight of Tony’s racing career came in the 2004 season when he clocked his good blue hen “Anniversary Waltz” to win 1st Open BBC Palamos. Recent performances since 2005 continue to demonstrate that Tony Leggatt has the knack of conditioning a team of pigeons for their designated races. See performances added here.

2005

POSITION

SECTION

RACE POINT

CLUB

58TH

6TH

ST NAZAIRE

NFC

166TH

17TH

ST NAZAIRE

NFC

       

48TH

8TH

TARBES

NFC

58TH

9TH

TARBES

NFC

124TH

20TH

TARBES

NFC

179TH

29TH

TARBES

NFC

       

2nd

1st

BERGERAC

C S CFC

4TH

3RD

BERGERAC

CS CFC

       

14TH

8TH

ST NAZAIRE

BBC

       

9TH

2ND

PALAMOS

BBC

       

8TH

5TH

SAN SEBASTIAN

BBC

22ND

9TH

SAN SEBASTIAN

BBC

32ND

12TH

SAN SEBASTIAN

BBC

71ST

28TH

SAN SEBASTIAN

BBC

       

10TH

5TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

22ND

10TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

26TH

12TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

62nd

22nd

BORDEAUX

BBC

81ST

28

BORDEAUX

BBC

       

YB 123RD

46TH

LAMBALLE

 

BBC ALL NATIONAL RACES AVERAGE, WINNING MR/MRS BRIAN REEVES TROPHY FOR A SECOND TIME

2006

POSITION

SECTION

RACE POINT

CLUB

14th    

4TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

19TH   

6TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

30TH   

11TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

       

126TH 

9TH

CARLISLE

BBC

       

57TH   

14TH

INGLETON

BBC

       

131ST  

35TH

CHOLET

CS CFC

138TH

37TH

CHOLET

CSCFC

146TH

41ST

CHOLET

CSCFC

160TH

44TH

CHOLET

CSCFC

       

10TH

1ST

BERGERAC

CSCFC

68TH

22ND

BERGERAC

CSCFC

134TH

52ND

BERGERAC

CSCFC

143RD

56TH

BERGERAC

CSCFC

162ND

69TH

BERGERAC

CSCFC

       

300TH

15TH

SENNEN COVE

NFC

       

YB 90TH

31ST

RAMSGATE

CSCFC

I RESIGNED FROM THE NFC BECAUSE OF THE ISLE OF WIGHT YOUNG BIRD RACE

2007

POSITION

SECTION

RACE POINT

CLUB

35th         

7th

MESSAC

BBC

       

126TH   

35TH

POITIERS

BBC

136TH   

38TH

POITIERS

BBC

       

40TH      

7TH

PALAMOS

BBC

62ND   

9TH

PALAMOS

BBC

78TH   

13TH

PALAMOS

BBC

103RD 

20TH

PALAMOS

BBC

194TH  

52ND

PALAMOS

BBC

       

167TH  

85TH

CHOLET

CSCFC

171TH 

87TH

CHOLET

CSCFC

       

26TH     

19TH

PAU

CSCFC

55TH     

32ND

PAU

CSCFC

56TH   

33RD

PAU

CSCFC

       

YB 127TH 

64TH

GUERNSEY

CSCFC

 

2008

POSITION

SECTION

RACE POINT

CLUB

63RD      

19TH

MESSAC

CSCFC

124TH  

46TH

MESSAC

CSCFC

125TH     

47TH

MESSAC

CSCFC

       

46TH       

29TH

TARBES

CSCFC

80TH       

45TH

TARBES

CSCFC

167TH    

95TH

TARBES

CSCFC

179TH  

102ND

TARBES

CSCFC

       

22ND    

14TH

BERGERAC

CSCFC

99TH    

42ND

BERGERAC

CSCFC

       

135TH  

36TH

POITIERS

BBC

       

47TH    

13TH

PALAMOS

BBC

       

92ND    

29TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

95TH    

31ST

BORDEAUX

BBC

100TH  

32ND

BORDEAUX

BBC

121ST  

36TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

136TH  

45TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

       

YB  70TH 

13TH

LAMBALLE

BBC

       
       

 

2009

POSITION

SECTION

RACE POINT

CLUB

54TH

25TH

BERGERAC

CSCFC

       

22ND

 

NARBONNE

PAUL O’LEARY

26TH  

 

NARBONNE

PAUL O’LEARY

       

22ND

3RD

PAU INTERNATIONAL       BICC

48TH

9TH

PAU INTERNATIONAL       BICC

       

5TH

2ND

MESSAC

BBC

       

20TH

6TH

BARCELONA

BBC

       

46TH

21ST

BORDEAUX

BBC

93RD

37TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

94TH

38TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

95TH

39TH

BORDEAUX

BBC

       

9TH

3RD

TARBES

CSCFC

15TH

5TH

TARBES

CSCFC

43RD

17TH

TARBES

CSCFC

54TH

20TH

TARBES

CSCFC

84TH

41ST

TARBES

CSCFC

WINNER SOUTH EAST AVERAGE LOCKMASTER TROPHY – WON TWICE

2010

POSITION

SECTION

RACE POINT

CLUB

49TH   OPEN

17TH

BERGERAC

CSCFC

       

20TH  OPEN

9TH

TARBES

CSCFC

25TH  OPEN

10TH

TARBES

CSCFC

       

22ND  OPEN

4TH

PAU INTERNATIONAL

WINNING 1ST HEN TROPHY CENTRAL SECTION

THE ABOVE RACING OLD BIRDS ONLY

Because of hawk trouble in March 2010, Tony raced young birds on the darkness system for the first tim. He won the young bird average and also won 1st Solent Fed Guernsey plus other good north and south road federation positions. The young birds were raced one week north road and the next week south road, with some races being flown from racepoints on the west coast.

Tony would like to thank his daughter-in-law Lyndsay for taking the photos, his son Philip for e-mailing them on, and his wife Susan for her ongoing support.

JOHN & SPENCER NICHOLSON

John Nicholson first started in the sport at the age of 13 and enjoyed a measure of success through to 500 miles racing on the North Road. However, after just three years John left the sport before resuming his pigeon racing career in 1980, flying in partnership with his son, Spencer. Since that time they have forged a formidable partnership whose birds rarely fail when sent to the distance.

Included amongst these memorable successes are wins at Barcelona, Marseille and Pau, Dax and 3 x1st at Perpignan with the BICC in International races. However, possibly the most memorable race of all was the BBC Palamos race of 2002. In this race the partners entered eight pigeons and the first pigeon in the clock finished at 2nd Open, with six more in the clock finishing in the first 47 of the Open result, in fact 6 of the birds were in the top 29 of the Open result. To underline the quality and stamina of these Palamos birds 6 were sent back to Perpignan some weeks later, where they performed just as impressively, winning 1st, 3rd, 4th,8th, & 17th  Open. John and Spencer’s NFC Pau team also recorded good positions in 2002 making it a truly memorable season.

John and Spencer Nicholson

Once again we see a team of outstanding long distance performers racing to a modestly sized back garden loft – quality not quantity being the watchword at the Nicholson set up.

The loft is of wooden construction with a pent style roof and measures 19 x 6 ft. It has three sections, two for the old bird team and the third for the young birds reared each year. It houses a total of just 70 pigeons at the height of the season and this number includes the old bird race team, young birds, plus any stock birds, including past winners and old favourites.

The loft is cleaned twice daily 365 days a year and John and Spencer have fitted a thin plastic sheet, 3 mm thick, to the floor which makes cleaning out a simple and quick procedure and not a chore. This plastic covering allows the partners to disinfect the loft floor from time to time without the risk of getting dampness in the loft. An Expelair extractor fan is also incorporated into the loft design thus minimizing dust and ensuring an adequate air flow within the loft. Since the loft faces north east John and Spencer rely on the onset of warmer weather and ambient air temperatures to bring on the form naturally; this coincides with the long races of July & August.

Home of champions

The front of the loft is half louvered and there are covers that go over the louvers allowing air to enter but preventing the cold north easterly wind and rain from driving into the loft. The upper half of the loft front is dowelled and, in the early part of the year, is covered in glass, which is removed during the summer months.

The foundation of the Nicholson family of long distance pigeons was laid thirty years ago with the purchase of a kit of youngsters from Eddie Newcombe, formerly of Macmerry in Scotland but now domiciled in Malta. At that time Eddie was winning scores of top positions in the SNFC and was considered by many to be amongst the very best fanciers in the UK and Europe. The first couple of seasons with the Newcombes proved to be very slow going as although the birds homed well they seemed somewhat lacking in pace. Nevertheless the partners persevered with them and resisted the temptation to outcross immediately but continued to breed around the original pigeons for the first 4 to 5 years. As they got to know the birds’ idiosyncracies, and they in turn began to acclimatize to the new location, things started to improve. With the exception of a few top quality crosses they have remained inbred to these originals for the last 30 years. As a result of this careful breeding plan allied to severe testing of each generation of offspring at the extreme distance, it would be fair to say that they can now be classed as the Nicholson Strain.

When they feel it is necessary to introduce a cross into the established family, John and Spencer never bring in more than one pigeon at any one time. These introductions have only been made on very rare occasions and they always opt for performance over pedigree when making their selections. If the outcross is successful judicial breeding back to the original family baseline is of paramount importance to ensure continuation of the strength of the familyBoth sexes are of the same importance in a mating as both have to carry the winning genes for stamina, speed and, of course, intelligence.

John and Spencer do not like big pigeons as their birds are small to medium, and some of the smallest hens have bred some of the best pigeons. As with all things that are required to fly, the bigger it is, the more energy is required to keep it in the air.

The partners firmly believe that inbreeding is the best way to keep a tight winning gene pool, as with out-crossing the fancier can never be quite sure where the winning birds will emerge. However, it has been proven time and time again that a good outcross brought into an inbred family can produce “hybrid vigour” in the subsequent offspring. As a result of the strict application of Darwin’s law of “survival of the fittest” that is strictly applied here, the present day family has evolved into a distinct type that differs from the originals in that they are smaller with more front and less length.

This carefully thought out breeding plan has resulted in the Nicholsons’ producing a number of successful breeding pairs, and these in addition to pairs that have been selected to go together because they have performed well at the extreme distance, form the basis of the present family.

All birds whether they be yearlings, stock birds or those penciled in for the marathon race programme in June, July and August, are mated in early to mid March. Once the first round eggs are laid it's a case of exercise around the loft and short training tosses out to 30 miles. At this time the loft is left open whenever possible for the birds to come and go, collecting nesting materials from the garden.

The partners have a training spot for both young and old birds, which is around 30 miles which they use whenever they think the birds need a pipe opener. Occasionally young birds are given some longer training tosses before the Young Bird National, around the Southampton area, which is about 80 miles. John and Spencer do not believe in single up training and as a result all birds are always released together. The old bird team, after their initial training then go to four or five 80 mile inland training races before competing in 2 or 3 200 mile channel races. They are then set up for their first crack at a long distance International race having had approximately four weeks rest from racing with just a few 30 mile training spins in the intervening period to bring them up to the mark.

The birds are raced naturally and the old bird team is normally around 40-50 pigeons. Sometimes during the season they might separate certain birds in order to give them an extra edge and have found that during these periods of separation the birds exercise with renewed enthusiasm.

The longer International races are between 600-700 miles and for pigeons to compete in these types of races, special qualities are required - stamina, intelligence and the ability to fly many miles on their own. These individuals are the epitome of pigeon racing and “they do not grow on trees”.

Since the Nicholsons race their pigeons on the natural system and expect their birds to compete in 2, sometimes 3, 500-700 mile races in any one season they cannot always be sent in their favourite nest condition. They firmly believe that if a pigeon is of the right quality and that it is fit, it will perform well in any nest condition. However, if they were to choose a specific nest condition they would aim to send the bird sitting around the time of hatch, or a few days either way. This would be both cocks and hens.

With regard to feeding, the partners do not believe that you can over feed a pigeon that is being prepared for an International race, especially when you consider the workload their birds are expected to undertake in any given season. The reader should be aware of the fact that ALL birds, including yearlings and late breds, are expected to compete in races out to at least 560 miles each year. As a result the birds have a normal widowhood type mix in front of them at all times. This is supplemented with peanuts and linseed plus a home made “cake mix” in the build up to a long race. On return from a long race the racers have honey dissolved in warm water in the drinker and are fed a light depurative type mix for the first day after return and then it’s a case of straight back on to the racing mixture.

The young bird team is also fed the same high carbohydrate widowhood mix to which 25% barley is added, throughout the season. This mixture is fed both morning and night and feeding stops when the birds start to leave the barley. With regard to young bird education, John and Spencer have not noticed any difference in the later careers of birds that have raced as young birds or those youngsters that have merely been trained – but they insist that the young birds must have some training in the year of their birth.

The birds are treated for canker as a precautionary measure throughout the season and they also receive a treatment to ensure that there are no respiratory problems, using Doxycycline, once again purely as a precautionary measure. The only other specific used is garlic and the drinkers can usually be found to have half a bulb of garlic in them 365 days a year, to which multivitamins are added mid week. The partners do however ensure that the birds have access to fresh supplies of grit and minerals on a daily basis.

There you have it, the methods of two more masters of long distance pigeon racing. I will add here the performances of the Nicholsons’ SEVEN Spanish Diploma winners. To win a Spanish Diploma the pigeon must appear three times on the result of the BBC Palamos/ Barcelona race – it takes some doing to win one let alone SEVEN.

John & Spencer's 7 Spanish Diploma Winners

Barkis

BBC Spanish Diploma Winner (1)

1st Sec, 5th Open BBC Palamos

4th Sec, 22nd open BBC Palamos

3rd Sec, 21st Open BBC Palamos

17th BICC Perpignan

3 x Palamos, 2 x Perpignan, 2 x Pau, 1 x Marseille, 1 x Dax

---

Dorrit

BBC Spanish Diploma Winner (2)

19th Sec, 94th Open BBC Palamos

11th Sec, 47th Open BBC Palamos

4th Sec, 22nd Open BBC Palamos

4th BICC Perpignan

9th BICC Marseille

19th BICC Pau

3 x Palamos, 2 x Pau, 2 x Perpignan, 1 x Marseille, 1 x San Sebastian

---

Kate

BBC Spanish Diploma Winner (3)

2nd Sec, 5th Open BBC Palamos

3rd Sec, 7th Open BBC Palamos

7th Sec, 34th Open BBC Palamos

3rd BICC Perpignan

3 x Winner of Greater Distance Single Bird

---

Hetty

BBC Spanish Diploma Winner (4)

1st Sec, 3rd Open BBC Palamos

13th Sec, 45th Open BBC Palamos

14th Sec, 73rd open BBC Palamos

4 x Palamos, 2 x Pau, 1 x San Sebastian, 1 x Dax

---

Dora

BBC Spanish Diploma Winner (5)

19th Sec, 125th Open BBC Palamos

2nd Sec, 8th Open BBC Palamos

13th Sec, 44th Open BBC Palamos

---

Miggs

BBC Spanish Diploma Winner (6)

9th Sec, 74th Open BBC Palamos

10th Sec, 33rd Open BBC Barcelona

4th Sec, 18th Open BBC Barcelona

2 x Palamos, 2 x Barcelona

---

Barkisson

BBC Spanish Diploma Winner (7)

14th Sec, 99th Open BBC Palamos

3rd Sec, 13th Open BBC Barcelona

9th Sec, 40th Open BBC Barcelona

7th BICC Marseille

8th BICC Perpignan

17th BICC Marseille

26th BICC Perpignan

Also flown another Palamos, Perpignan & Pau

 

The Nicholsons 7 BICC International Winners

Perpignan Susie

BICC Winner (1)

1st BICC Perpignan

28th Hens International

138th Full International

---

Little Nell

BICC Winner (2)

1st BICC Pau

3rd BICC Perpignan

---

Nancy

BICC Winner (3 & 4)

1st BICC Perpignan

1st BICC Perpignan

10th BICC Dax

25th BICC Barcelona

26th BBC Palamos

---

Marley

BICC Winner (5)

1st BICC Dax

4th BICC Dax

11th BICC Pau

Flown NFC Pau & San Sebastian

Also winner of Greater Distance Single Bird Dax

---

Sarah

BICC Winner (6)

1st BICC Barcelona

117th Hens International

364th Full International

4th BICC Marseille

198th NFC Pau

368th NFC Pau

Also winner of Greater Distance Single Bird Barcelona

---

Jinni

BICC Winner (7)

1st BICC Marseille

11th BICC Barcelona

14th BBC Palamos

26th BICC Perpignan

56th NFC Pau

127th NFC Dax

Also winner of Greater Distance Single Bird Barcelona

---

The Nicholsons National Flying Club Certificate of Merit Winner

 

Cornelius

1998, 16th Open NFC Pau, 555 miles

2000, 56th Open NFC Pau

2005, 92nd Open NFC Tarbes, clocked on day of liberation, 562 miles

Cornelius’s other performances over 500 miles include:

107th Open NFC Dax

364th Open NFC Pau

526th Open NFC Pau

536th Open NFC Pau/Saintes

567th Open NFC San Sebastian, 568 miles

8th BICC Perpignan International, 610 miles

22nd BICC Perpignan International

He also flew NFC Pau 1999, back in race time but not clocked.

Cornelius has flown the channel 33 times, a total distance of 11,500 miles and he has flown over 500 miles 10 times.

---

PLUM

3 x Barcelona – 692 miles

4 x Marseille – 600 miles

1 x Palamos – 666 miles

1 x Perpignan – 610 miles

1 x Pau – 560 miles

1 x Dax – 511 miles

1 x Bordeaux – 450 miles

11 times over 500 miles

9 times over 600 miles

7 times in the top 26 in National Races over 600 miles

Best 3 performances:

2nd BICC Marseille (beaten by a loft mate)

5th BICC Marseille

11th BBC Palamos (beaten by 2 loft mates)

In 2005 Plum became the 1st UK pigeon to fly Barcelona, Marseille and Perpignan in a 4 week period, chalking up 1900 miles in these 3 races.

---

A brief summary of what these birds have won:

7 Spanish Diplomas with the BBC

7 BICC International Wins

2 Europa Trophies (best average all International races)

NFC Certificate of Merit

7 Greater Distance Single Bird NFC races

In the last 10 years John and Spencer have clocked 65 pigeons from either Barcelona or Palamos. Some record!!!

My thanks to Tony Leggatt and John and Spencer Nicholson for their help and cooperation in producing this article. Good luck to you all for the future.